If You Build It

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If You Build It

[Click on Title for More Information]

If You Build It

[Click Title for More Information]

If You Build It

[Click on Title for More Information]

If You Build It

[Click on Title for More Information]

If You Build It

Sugar Hill, Harlem! No Longer Empty has been working closely with community partners, artists, and schools to stage a site-specific exhibition in the future Sugar Hill Apartments, a new Broadway Housing Communities building designed by architect David Adjaye. [Click title for details]

Sunday, February 10 2013 - Saturday, March 16 2013

Conversation/Workshop

Vertical Urban Factory

"Made in Long Island City" focuses on the factories in Long Island City shows process diagrams, industrial mapping, comparative statistics, photos and films of manufacturing. The installation examines the historical origins of factory architecture, contemporary factory design, and possible futures for its reinvention in cities today.

With the “new economy,” perhaps manufacturing can return to cities to be closer to their supply chain and consumers. Often manufacturing is not people-friendly; and can be noisy and pollute the environment. But today, with new innovations in production, and smaller scale facilities, zoning could allow for mixed and new industrial uses while also being sustainable. The essential synergy, both economic and urban, which manufacturing provides offers a potential for energy production, healthy live-work environments, and creates self-sufficient cities.

Long Island City was once filled with Vertical Urban Factories, such as Degnon Terminal, Sunshine Bakery, Adams Chewing Gum, Standard Motor, Eagle Electric, Swingline Staples, Paragon Paint, and CBS/Columbia Records among others.

Its early history was that of New York City’s—beginning with early Dutch and English settlers who lived among farms and dirt roads, towns and bridges, followed by industrialists who developed landfills and artificial landscapes, providing the infrastructure for 19th century railroads. The arrival of the Queensboro Bridge and the Midtown Tunnel with the expressways and subways traversing the river in the early 20th century connected the area to the larger urban whole.

This installation includes work of students in the Syracuse School of Architecture program in New York City. They completed mapping studies of land use and manufacturing, factory processing analysis and diagrams, finding that Long Island City is still a vital place of making things. 

Curator: Nina Rappaport

Generous support provided by Syracuse University and No Longer Empty.

Students: Lin Chen, Carla Cortes, Pedro Dorta, Conrad Hu, Carolina Jimenez, Marcus Johnson, Hiu Man Law, Katalyna Lee, Juan Llobera, Mike Ma, Scott Malloy, Cesar Molina, Adrienne Merheb, Zack Ranieri, Matt Scholander, Kelly Wang

This is a part of the Vertical Urban Factory project and traveling exhibition curated by Nina Rappaport and is a sponsored project of The New York Foundation for the Arts. www.verticalurbanfactory.org Rappaport is also co-author with Colin Cathcart and David Reinfurt of Long Island City: Connecting the Arts.

 

 


Related Exhibition:  How Much Do I Owe You?